Road bumps and traffic calming

Highway code rule 153
Traffic-calming measures. On some roads there are features such as road humps, chicanes and narrowings which are intended to slow you down. When you approach these features reduce your speed. Allow cyclists and motorcyclists room to pass through them. Maintain a reduced speed along the whole of the stretch of road within the calming measures. Give way to oncoming road users if directed to do so by signs. You should not overtake other moving road users while in these areas.

http://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/UKDVSA/bulletins/12e35f8

 

Don’t Drink & Drive

Highway Code Rule 95

Do not drink and drive as it will seriously affect your judgement and abilities.

In England and Wales you MUST NOT drive with a breath alcohol level higher than 35 microgrammes/100 millilitres of breath or a blood alcohol level of more than 80 milligrammes/100 millilitres of blood.

In Scotland the legal limits are lower. You MUST NOT drive with a breath alcohol level higher than 22 microgrammes/100 millilitres of breath or a blood alcohol level of more than 50 milligrammes/100 millilitres of blood.

Alcohol will

  • give a false sense of confidence
  • reduce co-ordination and slow down reactions
  • affect judgement of speed, distance and risk
  • reduce your driving ability, even if you’re below the legal limit
  • take time to leave your body; you may be unfit to drive in the evening after drinking at lunchtime, or in the morning after drinking the previous evening.

The best solution is not to drink at all when planning to drive because any amount of alcohol affects your ability to drive safely. If you are going to drink, arrange another means of transport.

Be fit to drive

Short term car insurance when learning to drive

Leanne Barker Driving School has teamed up with Collingwood Insurance Services to bring you Learner Driver car insurance.

A great way to help you support your driving lessons, by being able to drive a parent or others car (with a qualified driver) and practice between your driving lessons.

Collingwood Learner Driver Insurance

Know what to do if your car breaks down

In this cold weather, the likelihood that your car may breakdown is increased. As well as the below advice from the Highway Code – be prepared when out in winter. Take a phone, warm clothes, and suitable footwear in case you have to get out and walk.

The Highway Code says:

If your vehicle breaks down, think first of all other road users and:

  • get your vehicle off the road if possible
  • warn other traffic by using your hazard warning lights if your vehicle is causing an obstruction
  • help other road users see you by wearing light-coloured or fluorescent clothing in daylight and reflective clothing at night or in poor visibility
  • put a warning triangle on the road at least 45 metres (147 feet) behind your broken-down vehicle on the same side of the road, or use other permitted warning devices if you have them. Always take great care when placing or retrieving them, but never use them on motorways
  • if possible, keep your sidelights on if it is dark or visibility is poor
  • do not stand (or let anybody else stand) between your vehicle and oncoming traffic
  • at night or in poor visibility do not stand where you will prevent other road users seeing your lights

Driving advice for Icey and Snowy weather

Now that the cold snap has gripped us – its well worth reading the Highway Code Rule 228 about Driving in Icy & Snowy weather.

In winter check the local weather forecast for warnings of icy or snowy weather. DO NOT drive in these conditions unless your journey is essential. If it is, take great care and allow more time for your journey.

Take an emergency kit of de-icer and ice scraper, torch, warm clothing and boots, first aid kit, jump leads and a shovel, together with a warm drink and emergency food in case you get stuck or your vehicle breaks down.

Rip up your tax disc

From today, 1st October 2014, vehicles in the UK no longer need to display their paper road tax disc.

Unfortunately vehicle road tax still has to be paid for, but the DVLA‘s clever computers will know if you have paid or not.

More info